2019 Program

Since 1983, the Council on Sex Offender Treatment (CSOT) has been recognized by the State of Texas as the experts in the treatment and management of sex offenders. CSOT sets forth the standards of practice for the sex offender treatment providers in the State.

The Texas CSOT Conference hosts Licensed Counselors; Social Workers; Probation Officers; Family service workers; Prevention consultants; Community organizers; Law enforcement and community police personnel; School Teachers, Counselors & Administrators; Licensed Therapists and Psychologists.

The 2019 CSOT Conference will be held in San Antonio, TX at the Wyndham San Antonio Riverwalk Hotel on February 24 – 26.

2019 Schedule-at-a-Glance 

 

Sunday, February 24, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am – Keynote

Juveniles Who Have Offended Sexually: Risks and Resilience: Assessing Treatment Needs & Progress (Part 1)

Sue Righthand, PhD
Clinical and Consulting Psychologist
Juveniles who have offended sexually present with risk factors, but research findings suggest, they may be resilient, stop offending, and live pro-social lives. Effective interventions can facilitate such positive outcomes. To maximize effectiveness, interventions require high quality assessments. Initial and repeated risk and needs assessment are necessary for identifying appropriate treatment targets, intervention intensity, and service delivery. This keynote will briefly discuss unique issues specific to adolescents who have offended sexually, and then explore relevant risk and protective factors and their dynamic interactions that, when effectively addressed, may facilitate desistence from offending. We will review several existing and developing assessment measures that may promote effective interventions. We will also discuss the importance and utility of treatment progress assessments as indicators of program effectiveness.

Objectives

  • Increase attendee familiarity with dynamic criminogenic risk and protective factors.
  • Recognize the importance of selecting empirically informed and adequately validated risk and needs assessment protocols and how to do so.
  • Identify appropriate treatment targets, intervention intensity, and relevant service delivery, and demonstrate effective outcomes.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

10:00 – 10:30 am – Break

 

 

10:30 am – 12 pm – Keynote

Juveniles Who Have Offended Sexually: Risks and Resilience: Assessing Treatment Needs & Progress (Part 2)

Sue Righthand, PhD
Clinical and Consulting Psychologist
See Description for Part 1.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

 

1:30 – 3:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

Chronic Pornography Use and Other Sexual Excesses: A Guide for Treatment Providers

Karen Lawson, MPH, PhD
Independent Practice
Description to come.

Objectives:

  • Diagnose problematic sexual behavior in clients.
  • Identify co-existing factors in clients which may contribute to chronic pornography use.
  • Describe intervention techniques which can be helpful in clients with problematic sexual behavior.

(1.5 Offender / Victim Hours)

 

Implementing Effective Interventions: It’s Up To Us!

Sue Righthand, PhD
Clinical and Consulting Psychologist
In this workshop, we will review several guiding principles important for effective interventions with juveniles who have offended sexually. We will discuss the sometimes similar and often varying treatment needs that these youth present and appropriate interventions along a continuum of care. The session will cover some current promising and evidence-based approaches, and brainstorm how to overcome possible challenges to effective interventions as we problem-solve how we may be able to intervene effectively. Case examples will be presented to discuss and illustrate how we can use assessments to guide successful interventions. Interaction and dialogue are encouraged.

Objectives

  • Increase awareness of several guiding principles for effective interventions.
  • Describe strategies for enhancing individualized and socioecological interventions with juveniles who have offended sexually.
  • Identify ways to enhance effective interventions along a continuum of care

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Working with Non-Offending Parents in Child Sexual Abuse Cases

Dan Powers, LCSW, ACSW, LSOTP
Children’s Advocacy Center
This workshop is intended for professionals dealing with abused children and their non-offending parents. It will review types of non-offending parents and suggest a consistent approach in dealing with them from investigation through on-going treatment. Your actions can “make or break it” for the next professional dealing with the parent. We will discuss the range of emotions professionals may feel as well as the “do’s and don’ts” of dealing with non-offending parents, emphasizing the need for a collaborative, consistent approach when dealing with them.

Objectives:

  • Develop a framework for empathy for non-offending parents.
  • Gain an understanding of the dynamics and types of non-offending parent.
  • Identify consistent approach in dealing with non-offending parents.

(1.5 Victim Hours)

 

 

3:00 – 3:30 pm – Break

 

 

3:30 – 5:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

The Art of Testifying: Improving Your Delivery

Casey O’Neal, PhD
Private Practice
Your name is called, and you walk to the center of the courtroom, where the judge swears you in. You walk past the jury box to the witness stand. The jury stares at you, as you sit down. As you try to get comfortable in the witness chair, you wonder what questions will be asked during direct exam. Then you notice the opposing attorney has a three-ring binder, with your name on it. That is when you ask yourself, “Am I prepared?” “Do I really know what good testimony is?” “Will I be able to tell if I give good testimony?” This workshop is designed to help you testify well.

Objectives:

  • Define the steps necessary to prepare to testify.
  • Describe the fundamentals of testifying.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Crossover Between Domestic Violence and Sex Offender

Jesse Hansen, MPA
Colorado Division of Criminal Justice
and Dr. Brenna Tindall,
Arête Counseling Services, LLC
Treatment providers often struggle to identify, assess and treat offenders who crossover the spectrum of violent behaviors, specifically with issues of domestic and sexual violence. Are domestic violence offenders also sexual abusers to their partners? Do sex offenders use power and control within their intimate relationships? As a clinician, how do I identify such crossover behaviors, and once I have identified them, what do I do? Learning how these populations compare can mean the difference between successful identification of crossover issues, or failure to clinically address and treat underlying issues of the offender appropriately. In order to educate providers of indications of crossover behaviors, this presentation will provide an overview of the research of the risk and needs associated with domestic violence and sex offending populations while focusing on a victim safety approach. Using research, case studies, and small group work, this training will walk through practical examples that illustrate how to increase awareness and develop protocols to assist clinicians in this highly specialized, but often overlooked area.

Objectives:

  • Identify commonalities that exist between Domestic Violence Offenders and Sex Offenders.
  • Describe the importance in assessing and treating crossover behaviors for the reduction in recidivism.

(1.5 Offender / Victim Hours)

 

What Dr. Seuss Knows about Doing THIS Job! Wellness/Survival in “Our World”

Dan Powers, LCSW, ACSW, LSOTP
Children’s Advocacy Center
Dr. Seuss helps us gain some insight to our daily struggles, doubts and the reasons we stay in this job. We will discuss the places you go, the choices you make and how they give us the courage to move mountains. You will discover how lucky you are to do what you do. Whether you like them here or there, stress will find you anywhere. Come enjoy an hour or two if even if you’re old or if even if you’re new.

Objectives:

  • Describe how the stress of this job may affect you.
  • Examine why we stay in this profession.
  • Identify steps you can take to take care of yourself.

(1.5 Offender / Victim Hours)

 

 

 

Monday, February 25, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am – Keynote

Inside the Mind of the Sex Offender: Effective Interviewing (Part 1)

Matt Logan, PhD
Halo Forensic Behavioral Specialists
This seminar is essential for those working in the criminal justice system that are tasked with assessment, supervision, treatment, and investigation of sex offenders. This seminar will also benefit mental health experts and prosecutors who must get through the smokescreen and extract the truth in assessments and examinations.

Objectives:

  • Identify wants to interview and assess sex offenders.
  • Evaluate interviewing techniques.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

 

10:00 – 10:30 am – Break

 

 

10:30 am – 12:00 pm – Keynote

Inside the Mind of the Sex Offender: Effective Interviewing (Part 2)

Matt Logan, PhD
Halo Forensic Behavioral Specialists
See Description on Part 1.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

 

12:00 – 1:30 pm – Break

 

 

1:30 – 3:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

Supervisor Refresher Course (Part 1)

Shelly Graham, PhD, LPC-S, LSOTP-S
Shoal Creek Counseling
Description and objectives to come.

(1.5 Offender / Supervisor Hours)

 

Using Technology to Bridge the Communication Gap in the Treatment Team

Wendy Biesemeier, MS, DVA
ReliaTrax Director
James Hinderks, PhD
ReliaTrax Chief Technology Officer
Sharon Sanders, M.S., LPA, LPC-S, LSOTP-S, NCC
The Grey Matters Group Clinical Director
The panel will explore successes and challenges of maintaining communication between clinicians, clients, probation, parole, and advocates.

Objectives:

  • Identify the role HIPAA plays in treatment team communication.
  • Relate success stories utilizing technology in treatment.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Ethics (Part 1)

Aaron Pierce, PhD, LPC, LSOTP, Clinical and Forensic Consulting Services
and
Mathew Ferrara, PhD, LSOTP, Clinical and Forensic Psychology
Description and objectives to come.

(1.5 Ethics Hours)

 

 

3:00 – 3:30 pm – Break

 

 

3:30 – 5:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

Supervisor Refresher Course (Part 2)

Shelly Graham, PhD, LPC-S, LSOTP-S
Shoal Creek Counseling
Description and objectives to come.

(1.5 Offender / Supervisor Hours)

 

Young, Unafraid and Bound for Prison… Unless We Intervene

Ezio Leite, LPC, LSOTP
Edward Towns, LPC, LSOTP and
Timothy Edwards, LPC
Psychotherapy Services
Working with the Male Offender ages 17 – 23 has presented some unique challenges and often times their ability to benefit from treatment is cut short by their impulsive choices. Traditional sex offender treatment and Community supervision have not proven to be as effective with this population resulting in increased referrals to TDC and lost opportunities to lower their risks. PSY and Tarrant County Probation have collaborated to create a specialized program to clinically treat this individual and probation has changed the way that they supervise this individual.

Objectives:

  • Describe innovative treatment concepts applicable for the Youthful Adult Offender.
  • Identify innovative supervision techniques applicable for the adult youthful offender.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Ethics (Part 2)

Aaron Pierce, PhD, LPC, LSOTP, Clinical and Forensic Consulting Services
and
Mathew Ferrara, PhD, LSOTP, Clinical and Forensic Psychology
Description and objectives to come.

(1.5 Ethics Hours)

 

 

 

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

8:30 – 10:00 am – Keynote

Behavioral Progression – Pathways to Sexual Violence (Part 1)

Matt Logan, PhD
Halo Forensic Behavioral Specialists
Instrumental or targeted violence, especially sexual violence, follows a pathway leading from fantasy to commission of the crime. Knowing the pathway or behavioral progression of a particular offender allows intervention prior to another victimization.

Sexual behavior is repetitive because of the self-reinforcing nature of arousal. Fantasies derived early in life tend to remain and sexual interests do not shift easily. Thorndyke’s rule (1911) of “the best predictor of present behavior is past behavior” is especially true for sexual behavior. Not only can this be the basis of predicting and recognizing M.O., Signature, or Target Selection but this can illuminate past triggers, facilitators, and destabilizers that line the pathway in behavioral progression to a sexual re-offense. The ultimate goal is to intercept the pattern when it is observed in the future and prevent another sexual crime. This seminar includes video-taped offender interview clips.

Objectives:

  • Identify risk relevant factors and identifying patterns in the offender’s behavior.
  • Identify a way of understanding and perceiving the offender’s thoughts, emotions and behaviors prior to sexual offending.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

 

10:00 – 10:30 am – Break

 

 

10:30 am – 12:00 pm – Keynote

Behavioral Progression – Pathways to Sexual Violence (Part 2)

Matt Logan, PhD
Halo Forensic Behavioral Specialists
See Description for Part 1.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

 

12:00 – 1:30 pm – Lunch on Own

 

 

1:30 – 3:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

Strengths-Based Sex Offense-Specific Services: 41 Interventions for At-Risk (At-Promise) Client (Part 1)

Kevin Powell, PhD
Colorado State University, Department of Psychology
If we want people to learn how not to be sexually abusive, we need to do more than just teach them ‘what not to do’, we need to teach them ‘what to do’. There is growing evidence for the importance of embracing a prosocial strengths-based orientation within the field of sex offense-specific services, in order to create a psychologically safe environment that targets both risk management and health promotion. This presentation will provide participants with information about 41 strengths-based interventions (Powell, 2015), which target six areas–Relationship development, Optimistic Attitude development (hope), Asset development, Prosocial development, Intellectual development, and Provider/caregiver development. Empirical support for a strengths-based approach will be cited.

Objective:

  • Describe the six target areas you can use 41 strengths-based interventions to address.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

The Untouchables: Assessing and Managing Deviant Sexual Arousal

Sean Braun, LPC-S, LSOT-S
Ezio Leite, LPC-S, LSOTP-S
Lawrin Dean, LPC-S, LSOTP-S
Psychotherapy Services
Deviant Sexual Arousal as assessed by the Penile Plethysmograph is the single best predictor of sexual recidivism . In this day and age , where sexual risk is the buzzword, we have an ethical obligation to the Community to assess an Offender’s Risk but how can we accomplish this without the administration of the PPG. And, more importantly, what do we do with this information once we have determined the presence of a deviant sexual arousal. This workshop will discuss the role of deviancy in the sexual offense, specific ways in which an Offender maintains this deviancy and the behavioral interventions that can be used to address deviant sexual arousal.

Objectives:

  • Describe the role of sexual deviancy and the increased risk.
  • Identify Behavioral Interventions to use to effectively address sexual deviancy.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

A Balanced Approach: Treatment and Supervision Strategies to Reduce Risk and Address Client Needs from a Victim-Centered Approach

Missy Gursky, MA, LPC
Colorado Sex Offender Management Board
Angel Weant, BS
Probation can be a difficult and intimidating process for offender and victims. Many times, victims don’t understand what probation supervision and treatment means, what it entails, and where they can receive information about the offender’s status while participating in treatment and under probation supervision. This session will discuss the components of treatment and probation supervision for sex offenses. We take into consideration the risk and needs of offenders and the safety of victims to take a victim-centered approach to treatment and supervision utilizing appropriate assessments, and behavior-based programming. Probation and treatment providers must collaborate to continually improve services for victims while maintaining a balanced approach to effectively supervise and treat offenders to promote behavioral change. This workshop will provide some of the tools Colorado Probation and treatment agencies have developed to educate and inform victims relating to treatment and supervision and provide them information about the treatment contract and case management process.

Objectives:

  • Examine risk factors that are linked to reoffending behavior and various needs of the client.
  • Identify appropriate responses through a collaborative approach.
  • Describe strategies to reduce risk and promote effective behavior change, from a victim-centered approach.

(1.5 Offender / Victim Hours)

 

 

3:00 – 3:30 pm – Break

 

 

3:30 – 5:00 pm – Breakout Sessions

Strengths-Based Sex Offense-Specific Services: 41 Interventions for At-Risk (At-Promise) Client (Part 2)

Kevin Powell, PhD
Colorado State University, Department of Psychology
See Description in Part 1.

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Utilizing Experiential Strategies in Conjunction with CBT Therapy

Heather Shahan, PhD, LPC, LMFT, LSOTP
Psychotherapist
Research indicates Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the most effective course of treatment with those who have committed a sexual offense. Presenters will provide concrete examples of how experiential activities can be used to reinforce the cognitive behavioral process, while promoting a change in thinking through the use of client experiences. Concepts regularly addressed throughout the course of treatment include: creating healthy boundaries, effective communication, healthy relationships, victim empathy, criminal thinking, the offense cycle, sexual self-regulation, and decision making. These experiential techniques have been utilized with males, females, and juveniles as well as difficult clients. The techniques presented will be accompanied with the dynamic risk factors that are addressed in the activity.

Objectives:

  • Identify experiential activities to implement in practice.
  • Describe effective treatment strategies when working with those who sexually act out; helping to promote “no more victims.”

(1.5 Offender Hours)

 

Sexual Assault within the School System

Missy Gursky, MA, LPC
Colorado Sex Offender Management Board
Angel Weant, BS
Increasing concern about teacher student sexual relationships has led to significant consideration of boundaries in one of the most trust–based relationships which always includes elements of power and dependency. Teacher– student relationships differ from other trust –based relationships (therapist and patient) because of the collegiality considered vital for the student’s growth and development. Arguably, one of the most satisfying aspects of teaching can be found in the act of “mentoring relationships” that teachers cultivate with their students. Over time, the media and society have sensationalized these cases. Educational Institutions typically are reluctant to consider that anything, but healthy and appropriate boundaries exist between teachers and students. Therefore, the notion that sexual attraction between teacher and student occurs resulting in an inappropriate/illegal relationship; otherwise is a difficult conversation to have with educators and administrators.

We will uncover this subset as a population between teachers and students/athletes that has typically not been a prevalent discussion among therapeutic and community supervision professionals. We will go deeper into case law, assessing risk and needs using the VASOR-2 and SOTIPS with an emphasis on responsivity and individualizing services for treatment and community supervision. We will have taped perspectives from clients’ who have abused the relationship with a student/athlete.

Objectives:

  • Identify prevention efforts to prevent school sexual assault.

(1.5 Victim Hours)

 


Click on the links below to access handouts from previous years’ programs.

2018 Handouts

2017 Handouts

2016 Handouts

2015 Handouts